On Ashe v. Swenson: Double Jeopardy and Collateral Estoppel

Many laypersons suffer from misconceptions about the protections offered by the Double Jeopardy Clause contained in the 5th Amendment to the Constitution. As Blonde Justice pointed out in one of her funnier posts, for example, double jeopardy does not… Read More

Quarles v. Commonwealth: Coerced Confessions in Virginia

Aerial view of DC

In Quarles v. Commonwealth, a recently issued opinion by the Virginia Court of Appeals, the court considered a set of facts similar to the U.S. Supreme Court case of Rhode Island v. Innis.  However, finding a number of… Read More

The “Collective Knowledge” Doctrine in D.C.

D.C. skyline

  The firmly established “collective knowledge” doctrine in D.C. provides that, in determining whether the officers possessed sufficient knowledge to establish reasonable suspicion or probable cause for a search or seizure, it is not what any individual officer… Read More

Disorderly Conduct: D.C. Court Narrows The Scope

  Disorderly conduct is a really annoying charge. The first problem is that the offense is usually so broad and poorly defined that it is too easy for police to charge and too easy for the government to… Read More